Growing a Foodie, Part 4

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It’s time to continue with our top eight tips for guiding your child through their Eating Adventures. Refresh yourself on the first four here!

5)  Is it a motor planning thing?

Sometimes physical barriers keep your child stuck in a food avoidance pattern. Our son was not wild about meat, partly because he had trouble chewing it. As he got used to using his back teeth to chew (with the help of one of those sensory chews his occupational therapist provided), he was able to chew the meat better and found he liked it. He needs his protein, and meat is his main source. So discover if physical limitations are behind your child’s refusal to eat certain foods.

6)  Expected behaviors apply to mealtime too

Trying new foods and appropriate mealtime behavior are part of the expected behaviors we have for our son, and we try to reinforce this through explanations of what those behaviors are. These explanations are like a verbal Social Story in our house. You could always write your own Social Stories for each of the issues your child may be facing at mealtimes, whether is is trying a new food or staying at the table. Parents sometimes think eating should be an intuitive process, but I have found my son needs as much explanation, modeling and reinforcement with eating as he does in other challenging areas of his life.

7)  Experts can help

It’s worth considering a multi-vitamin to make sure your child is getting the vitamins and minerals she needs. Consult with your doctor if you are worried about your child’s nutrition. Our doctor was able to reassure us that our son’s growth chart was just fine, even with his limited diet. Try an occupational therapist if you have concerns about your child’s aversion to certain textures and tastes. And there are several centers that offer food clinics, where they specifically focus on addressing issues that interfere with eating. (See comments section for other local feeding clinics.)

8)  I’m too tired

There is one more reason why it can take so long to get my son to eat new foods: sometimes I just don’t have the energy to make the effort. Or the energy I have may need to go toward another issue that he is dealing with. I’ve learned that’s okay. If I’m stressing about finding foods for him, it doesn’t help. I love food and family dinners, so ultimately I want to make mealtime enjoyable, for all of us.

Taking it slow and steady helped keep me and my son relaxed during his process of learning to eat. I never thought curried lentils would be a standard meal in our house. But through helping our son try new foods, he has found a surprising favorite, and we did too!

This wasn’t enough, right? Discover the rest of Margaret’s tips and more at Food and Autism on February 28! more info>>

Read Part 1, Part 2 & Part 3 to discover all of Margaret’s great tips!

Author: Margaret

Margaret loves to read and take long walks. She parents a child with autism and is dedicated to sharing what she's learned with other parents.

One Comment

  1. Local Feeding Clinics:
    St. David’s Center for Child and Family Development – http://www.stdavidscenter.org/therapies/feeding-therapy

    Children’s Hospitals and Clinics of MN – http://www.childrensmn.org/Web/Services/035357.asp

    Courage Center – http://www.couragecenter.org/ContentPages/sos-feeding.aspx

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