Hello and Thank You

| 0 comments

Hello CEA community!

If you’re like me, you may have read Shannon Andreson’s “Farewell but not Goodbye” post and wondered, “now what?”. In sharing her decision to step down as executive director, Shannon reflected on the ebbs and flows of a child’s developmental journey and the way families respond and adapt.

Resisting my tendency to worry, I focused on my gratitude for Shannon’s leadership and the way the Center for Engaging Autism provided me with information, support, and meaningful relationships during the challenging early years of my family’s autism journey. During that time, my energy and resources ebbed—information, terminology, forms, and systems drained me, leaving uncertainty, overwhelm, and fear. For me, a return to a relative state of “flow” came slowly through building relationships with other parents who “get it” and who model what it looks like to understand and honor their children and themselves as whole, complex people. Realizing that I wasn’t alone and that others walked the path ahead of me was like that moment of pause when an ebbing wave begins to flow forward again. I have gradually channeled this energy into writing, learning, community-building, and advocacy related to autism, family as an asset and an adaptive system, and community as the place where we grow and connect.

Gratitude, hope, and trust prompted me to pursue the executive director position. I am so humbled and honored by this opportunity to contribute to the organization that has helped me “grow up” or, more accurately, “root down” as a parent within a rich community. I am immersing myself in the supportive network, knowledge, resources, and creative endeavors that Shannon, the CEA Board of Directors, and so many talented members of our community have cultivated over the years.

I will most definitely be in touch, and I look forward to meeting you and growing together.

-Beth Dierker

Author: Beth

Beth is a wife, mother, researcher and connector. She has two elementary-aged kids, one who is differently wired with autism. Beth has done graduate work and consulting related to youth development and community engagement. She loves advocating for authentic community engagement and contributions of kids and families impacted by autism. She lives in Hopkins, MN.

Thoughts? Post 'em.

%d bloggers like this: